Cat No: DTTR227CD

With platinum and gold selling accolades across their catalogue of 5 albums The Pigeon Detectives return with album 6, an album influenced by their biggest hits but matured beyond them.
Feeling like a band reborn The Pigeon Detectives have never really gone away, having quietly built a resurgent following at headline gigs and festivals across the UK with their high octane live show, the set is peppered with sing-a-long hits that have passed the test of time with flying colours attracting a younger audience to shows alongside a contingent of Pigeon ‘die hards’.

Produced by Rich Turvey (Blossoms / The Courteeners / The Coral / Vistas / Oscar Lang / Jamie Webster) the album holds onto the infectious energy that drove the band to huge audiences on their early records, but has a contemporary feel to the production, arrangements and lyrics reflecting a band that have honed their craft and grown as a band and people.

 

The Pigeon Detectives have always walked their own path. The Leeds outfit were outsiders from the start, never quite fitting in anywhere. As a result, they built their own world – five lads from Rothwell, finding success on their own terms. They’ve got frontman Matt Bowman’s biting vocals, blended with the clashing guitars of Oliver Main and Ryan Wilson; then there’s the stellar, on-point rhythm section of Dave Best (bass) and Jimmi Taylor (drums). It’s a winning formula, something The Pigeon Detectives have proved over and over.

New album ‘TV Show’ seems to distil this to a fine elixir. Nodding to the past while charting the future, it’s a record of turbo-charged indie pop bangers, the kind of songs that will electrify your evening. The Pigeon Detectives’ first in six years, it’s the work of musicians rediscovering each other, and what it means to be in a band.

 “This album is a celebration of our journey,” says Dave Best. “The rest of our albums are concerned with catching a moment in time, but this is a space for us to reflect. We’ve got to a place where we can celebrate who we are, who we have been, and who we’re gonna be in the future.”

Reconvening in a tiny subterranean rehearsal space two doors down from vital Leeds venue the Wardrobe, the band set about challenging themselves once more. Locked away by the pandemic – and newfound fatherhood – The Pigeon Detectives relished the chance to make a noise together. “The way we write is intense, we all have to be in the room together,” Dave says. “We made our reputation as an energetic live band. On this album, we wanted to capture the frenetic feel of our early albums, while growing musically. We wanted songs that would go down a storm at a festival. We wanted to capture the energy of our live shows. And that’s what we offer – we’ve always been a great live band.”

Working cheek-by-jowl, The Pigeon Detectives found that the chemistry of old was still in place. “We’ve known each other since we were five years old,” he says. “This is a safe space for us. We know each other so well. And we love making music together, otherwise we wouldn’t do it. Look, the music industry isn’t kind to bands, a lot don’t make it – the reason we’re still here is because we’re so close.”

Working quicky, The Pigeon Detectives were introduced to producer Rich Turvey (Blossoms, The Coral), and the clicked immediately. Within a few conversations, they felt like he was part of the band – they share an off-the-wall sense of humour, for one, and a similar energy. Heading to his studio in Liverpool, the band booked a flat in the city and began bringing ‘TV Show’ to reality.

 “When we do get together we absolutely cherish it,” Dave explains. “Being together in Liverpool was a joy… like a holiday. Like a stag do with work! The album reflects where we are now, while also doffing its cap to each step along the way. It speaks to the past, but also where we want to go to as a band. It captures little bits of our past. It’s us celebrating us.”

Putting their pedal to the metal, The Pigeon Detectives smashed out song after song. Nothing was wasted, and nothing was delayed – few songs were allowed to extend beyond four takes. “It became a really fast-paced environment… we didn’t want to stew on anything for too long, we just wanted to capture a vibe.”

Punchy, dynamic, supremely addictive comeback single ‘Lovers Come Lovers Go’ is the first sign fans will get of this new direction. It’s a ballsy, swaggering return, tailormade for those sweat-drenched live sets. “It came naturally,” he says. “And we always trust the songs that just flow. We wanted to smack people around the face with a two-and-a-half-minute banger that channels what the Pigeon Detectives do so well.”

The energy doesn’t dip for one single second across the whole album, a set of helter-skelter indie anthems that reminds you how fun, how vital British guitar music can be. Yet it’s also a moving record – ‘Would It Be So Bad’ is a tender plea penned mere days before sessions began, while the delicate groove that underpins ‘The Warning’ was perfected in that same Liverpool flat. Front to back, this is Matt Bowman and Oliver Main’s most nuanced emotional document.

“Matt’s come into his own,” he says. “It’s more self-reflective now. Bittersweet. Sometimes it’s easier to write something down and sing them rather than talking about them.”

“We have the same sense of humour that we had when we were kids,” Dave laughs. “All the old in-jokes come back! But we’re embracing where are now as people. This album is more contemplative.”

The band’s first album in six years, there was never any question of The Pigeon Detectives going quietly into the night. The bonds between them are too deep, the love of music too ingrained within them. “We’ve never had the luxury of falling back on to savings or anything. It’s this working class, grind-it-out-mentality. We’ve always had an us-against-the-world thing in this band.”

Hitting the live circuit last summer, The Pigeon Detectives trialled new ideas at Sheffield’s Tramlines, and Manchester’s massive Neighbourhood Festival. Joined by a new generation of fans – “we’ve become this coming-of-age ritual” – the group found themselves at ease with who they are. Carrying this quiet confidence into the studio, ‘TV Show’ is a superb anthology of what makes The Pigeon Detectives such a thrilling proposition.

“We trust our instincts now. We don’t need to please anyone,” he says. “We’ve always been in control of our own destiny. Nothing has changed, except we’re more at peace with who we are. When you stop rushing and take a breath, that’s when you find out who you are – and that’s what we’re doing on this album.”

With their finest material to date now complete, The Pigeon Detectives are looking to the future. Rightly confident in their abilities, the band are itching to re-connect with the world, show by sold out show. “The tracklisting is done. The artwork is done. The hard work is done, and it’s time to start enjoying it

TV Show

From £12.99

Cat No: DTTR227CD

With platinum and gold selling accolades across their catalogue of 5 albums The Pigeon Detectives return with album 6, an album influenced by their biggest hits but matured beyond them.
Feeling like a band reborn The Pigeon Detectives have never really gone away, having quietly built a resurgent following at headline gigs and festivals across the UK with their high octane live show, the set is peppered with sing-a-long hits that have passed the test of time with flying colours attracting a younger audience to shows alongside a contingent of Pigeon ‘die hards’.

Produced by Rich Turvey (Blossoms / The Courteeners / The Coral / Vistas / Oscar Lang / Jamie Webster) the album holds onto the infectious energy that drove the band to huge audiences on their early records, but has a contemporary feel to the production, arrangements and lyrics reflecting a band that have honed their craft and grown as a band and people.

Band Bio

The Pigeon Detectives have always walked their own path. The Leeds outfit were outsiders from the start, never quite fitting in anywhere. As a result, they built their own world – five lads from Rothwell, finding success on their own terms. They’ve got frontman Matt Bowman’s biting vocals, blended with the clashing guitars of Oliver Main and Ryan Wilson; then there’s the stellar, on-point rhythm section of Dave Best (bass) and Jimmi Taylor (drums). It’s a winning formula, something The Pigeon Detectives have proved over and over.

New album ‘TV Show’ seems to distil this to a fine elixir. Nodding to the past while charting the future, it’s a record of turbo-charged indie pop bangers, the kind of songs that will electrify your evening. The Pigeon Detectives’ first in six years, it’s the work of musicians rediscovering each other, and what it means to be in a band.

“This album is a celebration of our journey,” says Dave Best. “The rest of our albums are concerned with catching a moment in time, but this is a space for us to reflect. We’ve got to a place where we can celebrate who we are, who we have been, and who we’re gonna be in the future.”

Reconvening in a tiny subterranean rehearsal space two doors down from vital Leeds venue the Wardrobe, the band set about challenging themselves once more. Locked away by the pandemic – and newfound fatherhood – The Pigeon Detectives relished the chance to make a noise together. “The way we write is intense, we all have to be in the room together,” Dave says. “We made our reputation as an energetic live band. On this album, we wanted to capture the frenetic feel of our early albums, while growing musically. We wanted songs that would go down a storm at a festival. We wanted to capture the energy of our live shows. And that’s what we offer – we’ve always been a great live band.”

Working cheek-by-jowl, The Pigeon Detectives found that the chemistry of old was still in place. “We’ve known each other since we were five years old,” he says. “This is a safe space for us. We know each other so well. And we love making music together, otherwise we wouldn’t do it. Look, the music industry isn’t kind to bands, a lot don’t make it – the reason we’re still here is because we’re so close.”

Working quicky, The Pigeon Detectives were introduced to producer Rich Turvey (Blossoms, The Coral), and the clicked immediately. Within a few conversations, they felt like he was part of the band – they share an off-the-wall sense of humour, for one, and a similar energy. Heading to his studio in Liverpool, the band booked a flat in the city and began bringing ‘TV Show’ to reality.

“When we do get together we absolutely cherish it,” Dave explains. “Being together in Liverpool was a joy… like a holiday. Like a stag do with work! The album reflects where we are now, while also doffing its cap to each step along the way. It speaks to the past, but also where we want to go to as a band. It captures little bits of our past. It’s us celebrating us.”

Putting their pedal to the metal, The Pigeon Detectives smashed out song after song. Nothing was wasted, and nothing was delayed – few songs were allowed to extend beyond four takes. “It became a really fast-paced environment… we didn’t want to stew on anything for too long, we just wanted to capture a vibe.”

Punchy, dynamic, supremely addictive comeback single ‘Lovers Come Lovers Go’ is the first sign fans will get of this new direction. It’s a ballsy, swaggering return, tailormade for those sweat-drenched live sets. “It came naturally,” he says. “And we always trust the songs that just flow. We wanted to smack people around the face with a two-and-a-half-minute banger that channels what the Pigeon Detectives do so well.”

The energy doesn’t dip for one single second across the whole album, a set of helter-skelter indie anthems that reminds you how fun, how vital British guitar music can be. Yet it’s also a moving record – ‘Would It Be So Bad’ is a tender plea penned mere days before sessions began, while the delicate groove that underpins ‘The Warning’ was perfected in that same Liverpool flat. Front to back, this is Matt Bowman and Oliver Main’s most nuanced emotional document.

“Matt’s come into his own,” he says. “It’s more self-reflective now. Bittersweet. Sometimes it’s easier to write something down and sing them rather than talking about them.”

“We have the same sense of humour that we had when we were kids,” Dave laughs. “All the old in-jokes come back! But we’re embracing where are now as people. This album is more contemplative.”

The band’s first album in six years, there was never any question of The Pigeon Detectives going quietly into the night. The bonds between them are too deep, the love of music too ingrained within them. “We’ve never had the luxury of falling back on to savings or anything. It’s this working class, grind-it-out-mentality. We’ve always had an us-against-the-world thing in this band.”

Hitting the live circuit last summer, The Pigeon Detectives trialled new ideas at Sheffield’s Tramlines, and Manchester’s massive Neighbourhood Festival. Joined by a new generation of fans – “we’ve become this coming-of-age ritual” – the group found themselves at ease with who they are. Carrying this quiet confidence into the studio, ‘TV Show’ is a superb anthology of what makes The Pigeon Detectives such a thrilling proposition.

“We trust our instincts now. We don’t need to please anyone,” he says. “We’ve always been in control of our own destiny. Nothing has changed, except we’re more at peace with who we are. When you stop rushing and take a breath, that’s when you find out who you are – and that’s what we’re doing on this album.”

With their finest material to date now complete, The Pigeon Detectives are looking to the future. Rightly confident in their abilities, the band are itching to re-connect with the world, show by sold out show. “The tracklisting is done. The artwork is done. The hard work is done, and it’s time to start enjoying it

Cat No: DTTR227VINYL

With platinum and gold selling accolades across their catalogue of 5 albums The Pigeon Detectives return with album 6, an album influenced by their biggest hits but matured beyond them.
Feeling like a band reborn The Pigeon Detectives have never really gone away, having quietly built a resurgent following at headline gigs and festivals across the UK with their high octane live show, the set is peppered with sing-a-long hits that have passed the test of time with flying colours attracting a younger audience to shows alongside a contingent of Pigeon ‘die hards’.

Produced by Rich Turvey (Blossoms / The Courteeners / The Coral / Vistas / Oscar Lang / Jamie Webster) the album holds onto the infectious energy that drove the band to huge audiences on their early records, but has a contemporary feel to the production, arrangements and lyrics reflecting a band that have honed their craft and grown as a band and people.

Band Bio

The Pigeon Detectives have always walked their own path. The Leeds outfit were outsiders from the start, never quite fitting in anywhere. As a result, they built their own world – five lads from Rothwell, finding success on their own terms. They’ve got frontman Matt Bowman’s biting vocals, blended with the clashing guitars of Oliver Main and Ryan Wilson; then there’s the stellar, on-point rhythm section of Dave Best (bass) and Jimmi Taylor (drums). It’s a winning formula, something The Pigeon Detectives have proved over and over.

New album ‘TV Show’ seems to distil this to a fine elixir. Nodding to the past while charting the future, it’s a record of turbo-charged indie pop bangers, the kind of songs that will electrify your evening. The Pigeon Detectives’ first in six years, it’s the work of musicians rediscovering each other, and what it means to be in a band.

“This album is a celebration of our journey,” says Dave Best. “The rest of our albums are concerned with catching a moment in time, but this is a space for us to reflect. We’ve got to a place where we can celebrate who we are, who we have been, and who we’re gonna be in the future.”

Reconvening in a tiny subterranean rehearsal space two doors down from vital Leeds venue the Wardrobe, the band set about challenging themselves once more. Locked away by the pandemic – and newfound fatherhood – The Pigeon Detectives relished the chance to make a noise together. “The way we write is intense, we all have to be in the room together,” Dave says. “We made our reputation as an energetic live band. On this album, we wanted to capture the frenetic feel of our early albums, while growing musically. We wanted songs that would go down a storm at a festival. We wanted to capture the energy of our live shows. And that’s what we offer – we’ve always been a great live band.”

Working cheek-by-jowl, The Pigeon Detectives found that the chemistry of old was still in place. “We’ve known each other since we were five years old,” he says. “This is a safe space for us. We know each other so well. And we love making music together, otherwise we wouldn’t do it. Look, the music industry isn’t kind to bands, a lot don’t make it – the reason we’re still here is because we’re so close.”

Working quicky, The Pigeon Detectives were introduced to producer Rich Turvey (Blossoms, The Coral), and the clicked immediately. Within a few conversations, they felt like he was part of the band – they share an off-the-wall sense of humour, for one, and a similar energy. Heading to his studio in Liverpool, the band booked a flat in the city and began bringing ‘TV Show’ to reality.

“When we do get together we absolutely cherish it,” Dave explains. “Being together in Liverpool was a joy… like a holiday. Like a stag do with work! The album reflects where we are now, while also doffing its cap to each step along the way. It speaks to the past, but also where we want to go to as a band. It captures little bits of our past. It’s us celebrating us.”

Putting their pedal to the metal, The Pigeon Detectives smashed out song after song. Nothing was wasted, and nothing was delayed – few songs were allowed to extend beyond four takes. “It became a really fast-paced environment… we didn’t want to stew on anything for too long, we just wanted to capture a vibe.”

Punchy, dynamic, supremely addictive comeback single ‘Lovers Come Lovers Go’ is the first sign fans will get of this new direction. It’s a ballsy, swaggering return, tailormade for those sweat-drenched live sets. “It came naturally,” he says. “And we always trust the songs that just flow. We wanted to smack people around the face with a two-and-a-half-minute banger that channels what the Pigeon Detectives do so well.”

The energy doesn’t dip for one single second across the whole album, a set of helter-skelter indie anthems that reminds you how fun, how vital British guitar music can be. Yet it’s also a moving record – ‘Would It Be So Bad’ is a tender plea penned mere days before sessions began, while the delicate groove that underpins ‘The Warning’ was perfected in that same Liverpool flat. Front to back, this is Matt Bowman and Oliver Main’s most nuanced emotional document.

“Matt’s come into his own,” he says. “It’s more self-reflective now. Bittersweet. Sometimes it’s easier to write something down and sing them rather than talking about them.”

“We have the same sense of humour that we had when we were kids,” Dave laughs. “All the old in-jokes come back! But we’re embracing where are now as people. This album is more contemplative.”

The band’s first album in six years, there was never any question of The Pigeon Detectives going quietly into the night. The bonds between them are too deep, the love of music too ingrained within them. “We’ve never had the luxury of falling back on to savings or anything. It’s this working class, grind-it-out-mentality. We’ve always had an us-against-the-world thing in this band.”

Hitting the live circuit last summer, The Pigeon Detectives trialled new ideas at Sheffield’s Tramlines, and Manchester’s massive Neighbourhood Festival. Joined by a new generation of fans – “we’ve become this coming-of-age ritual” – the group found themselves at ease with who they are. Carrying this quiet confidence into the studio, ‘TV Show’ is a superb anthology of what makes The Pigeon Detectives such a thrilling proposition.

“We trust our instincts now. We don’t need to please anyone,” he says. “We’ve always been in control of our own destiny. Nothing has changed, except we’re more at peace with who we are. When you stop rushing and take a breath, that’s when you find out who you are – and that’s what we’re doing on this album.”

With their finest material to date now complete, The Pigeon Detectives are looking to the future. Rightly confident in their abilities, the band are itching to re-connect with the world, show by sold out show. “The tracklisting is done. The artwork is done. The hard work is done, and it’s time to start enjoying it

Cat No: DTTR227INDIES

With platinum and gold selling accolades across their catalogue of 5 albums The Pigeon Detectives return with album 6, an album influenced by their biggest hits but matured beyond them.
Feeling like a band reborn The Pigeon Detectives have never really gone away, having quietly built a resurgent following at headline gigs and festivals across the UK with their high octane live show, the set is peppered with sing-a-long hits that have passed the test of time with flying colours attracting a younger audience to shows alongside a contingent of Pigeon ‘die hards’.

Produced by Rich Turvey (Blossoms / The Courteeners / The Coral / Vistas / Oscar Lang / Jamie Webster) the album holds onto the infectious energy that drove the band to huge audiences on their early records, but has a contemporary feel to the production, arrangements and lyrics reflecting a band that have honed their craft and grown as a band and people.

Band Bio

The Pigeon Detectives have always walked their own path. The Leeds outfit were outsiders from the start, never quite fitting in anywhere. As a result, they built their own world – five lads from Rothwell, finding success on their own terms. They’ve got frontman Matt Bowman’s biting vocals, blended with the clashing guitars of Oliver Main and Ryan Wilson; then there’s the stellar, on-point rhythm section of Dave Best (bass) and Jimmi Taylor (drums). It’s a winning formula, something The Pigeon Detectives have proved over and over.

New album ‘TV Show’ seems to distil this to a fine elixir. Nodding to the past while charting the future, it’s a record of turbo-charged indie pop bangers, the kind of songs that will electrify your evening. The Pigeon Detectives’ first in six years, it’s the work of musicians rediscovering each other, and what it means to be in a band.

“This album is a celebration of our journey,” says Dave Best. “The rest of our albums are concerned with catching a moment in time, but this is a space for us to reflect. We’ve got to a place where we can celebrate who we are, who we have been, and who we’re gonna be in the future.”

Reconvening in a tiny subterranean rehearsal space two doors down from vital Leeds venue the Wardrobe, the band set about challenging themselves once more. Locked away by the pandemic – and newfound fatherhood – The Pigeon Detectives relished the chance to make a noise together. “The way we write is intense, we all have to be in the room together,” Dave says. “We made our reputation as an energetic live band. On this album, we wanted to capture the frenetic feel of our early albums, while growing musically. We wanted songs that would go down a storm at a festival. We wanted to capture the energy of our live shows. And that’s what we offer – we’ve always been a great live band.”

Working cheek-by-jowl, The Pigeon Detectives found that the chemistry of old was still in place. “We’ve known each other since we were five years old,” he says. “This is a safe space for us. We know each other so well. And we love making music together, otherwise we wouldn’t do it. Look, the music industry isn’t kind to bands, a lot don’t make it – the reason we’re still here is because we’re so close.”

Working quicky, The Pigeon Detectives were introduced to producer Rich Turvey (Blossoms, The Coral), and the clicked immediately. Within a few conversations, they felt like he was part of the band – they share an off-the-wall sense of humour, for one, and a similar energy. Heading to his studio in Liverpool, the band booked a flat in the city and began bringing ‘TV Show’ to reality.

“When we do get together we absolutely cherish it,” Dave explains. “Being together in Liverpool was a joy… like a holiday. Like a stag do with work! The album reflects where we are now, while also doffing its cap to each step along the way. It speaks to the past, but also where we want to go to as a band. It captures little bits of our past. It’s us celebrating us.”

Putting their pedal to the metal, The Pigeon Detectives smashed out song after song. Nothing was wasted, and nothing was delayed – few songs were allowed to extend beyond four takes. “It became a really fast-paced environment… we didn’t want to stew on anything for too long, we just wanted to capture a vibe.”

Punchy, dynamic, supremely addictive comeback single ‘Lovers Come Lovers Go’ is the first sign fans will get of this new direction. It’s a ballsy, swaggering return, tailormade for those sweat-drenched live sets. “It came naturally,” he says. “And we always trust the songs that just flow. We wanted to smack people around the face with a two-and-a-half-minute banger that channels what the Pigeon Detectives do so well.”

The energy doesn’t dip for one single second across the whole album, a set of helter-skelter indie anthems that reminds you how fun, how vital British guitar music can be. Yet it’s also a moving record – ‘Would It Be So Bad’ is a tender plea penned mere days before sessions began, while the delicate groove that underpins ‘The Warning’ was perfected in that same Liverpool flat. Front to back, this is Matt Bowman and Oliver Main’s most nuanced emotional document.

“Matt’s come into his own,” he says. “It’s more self-reflective now. Bittersweet. Sometimes it’s easier to write something down and sing them rather than talking about them.”

“We have the same sense of humour that we had when we were kids,” Dave laughs. “All the old in-jokes come back! But we’re embracing where are now as people. This album is more contemplative.”

The band’s first album in six years, there was never any question of The Pigeon Detectives going quietly into the night. The bonds between them are too deep, the love of music too ingrained within them. “We’ve never had the luxury of falling back on to savings or anything. It’s this working class, grind-it-out-mentality. We’ve always had an us-against-the-world thing in this band.”

Hitting the live circuit last summer, The Pigeon Detectives trialled new ideas at Sheffield’s Tramlines, and Manchester’s massive Neighbourhood Festival. Joined by a new generation of fans – “we’ve become this coming-of-age ritual” – the group found themselves at ease with who they are. Carrying this quiet confidence into the studio, ‘TV Show’ is a superb anthology of what makes The Pigeon Detectives such a thrilling proposition.

“We trust our instincts now. We don’t need to please anyone,” he says. “We’ve always been in control of our own destiny. Nothing has changed, except we’re more at peace with who we are. When you stop rushing and take a breath, that’s when you find out who you are – and that’s what we’re doing on this album.”

With their finest material to date now complete, The Pigeon Detectives are looking to the future. Rightly confident in their abilities, the band are itching to re-connect with the world, show by sold out show. “The tracklisting is done. The artwork is done. The hard work is done, and it’s time to start enjoying it

Clear
Genre:Indie Rock Record Label:Dance To The Radio Release Date:07/07/2023
Please be aware that not all items on the website are in stock! An item which is "Available on back-order" will need to ordered in from the supplier as we do not currently hold it in stock. For more information please see the stock availability section within the FAQ for details.